Tag Archives: craft beer

North Coast Brewing Plays a Major Role in the 2013 Annual Monterey Jazz Festival

MJF-Next-Generation-Performers(w)The 56th annual Monterey Jazz Festival will take place Friday, September 20 through Sunday, September 22 at the Monterey Fairgrounds in Monterey, California. Founded in 1958 by legendary jazz alto saxophonist Jimmy Lyons and Ralph Gleason, music critic, San Francisco Chronicle writer and founding editor of Rolling Stone magazine, the MJF presents three days of concerts by some of the best jazz performers in the world. The MJF has the distinction of being the longest running jazz festival in the world.

North Coast Brewing, in its eighth season as the brewery partner to the Monterey Jazz Festival, is the current longest running sustaining partner. This year NCBC is presenting four special beers – Le Merle, PranQster, Old Rasputin and Old Stock Ale - in tastings hosted by the MJF. As usual, Red Seal Ale, Brother Thelonious and Scrimshaw will be served through the Fairgrounds. The tastings are $5 per person. All proceeds go the MJF Education Programs.

NCBC’s Senior Vice President/Director of Sales Doug Moody and Northern California Sales Manager Josh Charlton will be at the tastings to talk about beer and answer questions. The tastings will be in the Festival’s Education Pavilion and are scheduled as follows:

Friday, September 20 from 6:30 to 7:30 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 12:30 to 1:30 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 7:00 to 8:00 pm
Sunday, September 22 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm

Claire-Daly-Quartet-in-Central-Park.(w)jpgThe Claire Daly Quartet will perform on Saturday, September 21 at 2:30 at the Night Club, one of the eight stages at the Festival. The concert, presented by NCBC, will be a performance of selections from Baritone Monk, a CD produced by Doug Moody and entirely underwritten by NCBC. The Quartet’s players – Claire Daly on baritone sax, Steve Hudson on piano, Mary Ann McSweeney on bass and Peter Grant on drums – swing their way through Thelonious Monk’s repertoire with “…the casual joy of a jam session.” Claire will be at the Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening Beer Tastings to sign CDs and chat about her experiences as a jazz musician and making Baritone Monk.

This year’s Monterey Jazz Festival promises a great line up of artists and concerts, jazz conversations, panel discussions, workshops, exhibitions, clinics, and an international array of food, NCBC beer and beer tastings, shopping, and festivities spread throughout the 20-acre Monterey Fairgrounds. There’s nothing quite like it anywhere else on the planet and North Coast Brewing is proud to be a part of this celebration of all things jazz!

Top photo: MJF Next Generation Scholarship Performers
Claire Daly Quartet photo by Marc Millman

Posted in Beer, Brother Thelonious, California, Events, Jazz, Le Merle, NCBC Staff, News, Old Rasputin, Old Stock Ale, PranQster, Press Release, Red Seal Ale, Scrimshaw | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Why Pilsner is the Best Craft Beer of All Time: So Many Reasons to Love Pilsners

Published in The Daily Meal Jul 23, 2013
By John Verive of Beer of Tomorrow for Menuism Beer Blog

Scrimshaw-Pilsner-Pour(w)As craft beer gains popularity, tap lists grow longer, and beers become more creative and extreme, it sometimes seems that a craft beer fan can have too many options. It may be a wonderful problem to face, but if you’d rather not struggle deciding what beer to try there’s a simple solution. If you just want a satisfying and restorative beer, try a pilsner. The classic golden lager makes for an excellent start to a session, is great before a meal, and pilsners pair wonderfully with many foods. It’s an easy call; try one and see why the pilsner is considered by many brewers to be “the brewer’s beer.”

If you’re not yet a convert to the well-crafted and balanced pilsners, forget your preconceived notions about the style. Pilsner, or simply pils, is known for its delicate color, sparkling carbonation, bready malt body, and spicy and herbal hop character and aroma that is highlighted by a dry, crisp finish. The style was so popular after its invention in 19th-century Bohemia that it swept through Europe before it was taken across the Atlantic by brewers immigrating to America. The American pilsner started off like its continental counterpart: balanced, dry, and with an assertive hop aroma, but American breweries diminished the beer to appeal to a wider audience, and soon the American Pilsner developed into the bland, insipid beer that many people think of today.

Scrimshaw-Brand-Image(w)When first arriving at a bar, I’ll often skim the tap list for a craft pilsner instead of suffering through the analysis paralysis that an impressively long and varied beer list can induce. Once the aromatic pils is in hand, I can more carefully review the menu and tap list for perfect pairings while I enjoy the crisp, refreshing qualities that the pilsner is prized for. Starting off the night with a pilsner works well for a few reasons. It’s commonly recommended to begin a tasting session with a beer that is comparatively light in body and flavor. This allows you to experience the beer’s more subtle flavors before your palate becomes fatigued, and pilsners make excellent “warm-up beers.” The lager’s lively carbonation awakens your taste buds, and the delicate flavors of the signature pilsner malt and European hops are best enjoyed before your palate has been assaulted by massive double IPAs. Picking out these flavors from such a balanced and nuanced brew is a great way to prepare yourself for tasting other brews, and the clean, ester-free finish leaves your palate primed for another sip (or another pint).

 

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The U.S. brewery count keeps on climbing. Raise your glass!

From an article in The Weekly Pint:

The American craft beer revolution marches on. From an all-time low of 44 in the late 1970s, the nation is now dotted with some 2,130 breweries changing the way we drink beer every day. Portland, Oregon, with its abundant real estate, lowish brewers’ taxes, and access to pristine raw materials from hardy hops to high mountain water leads the way with over fifty breweries in the Rose City (the state has 153 operated by 120 companies overall). Vermont leads the way per capita, with a busy brewery for every 26,073 people. According to figures recently released by the Brewers Association, over 1,300 breweries are in-planning across the U.S., which will send our total well north of 3,000, most in the world. Thirsty yet?

Almost no matter how you look at it, this craft beer revolution is a good thing: according to the Brewers Association, it helps generate jobs (over 100,000 so far) and economic activity (an estimated $3 billion annually in California alone, according to a recent study by the California Craft Brewers Association), and most importantly, the beautiful experience of better beer made by humans, not robots. We’ve heard a few curmudgeons mutter aloud about whether or not there are “too many breweries.” To those killjoys we pose a simple question: has anyone ever complained about “too many wineries”? There are over 7,000 in the U.S. by the way. We’ll reserve the innovative, locally made – and most of all, delicious – creations of craft beer America for cheerier company.

Read the whole article here.

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