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North Coast Brewing Co. News

Sheila Martins Promoted to Assistant Vice President of Sales & Administration at North Coast Brewing Company

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In 1995 Sheila Martins began working at North Coast Brewing Company as a substitute for the receptionist who was on a two week vacation. When the receptionist decided not to return, Sheila was hired for the position. Over the last 19 years Sheila’s work has evolved and changed, and this past April she was promoted to the position of Assistant Vice President of Sales & Administration.

Sheila attended Santa Clara University as an undergraduate, and Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, where she earned a teaching credential. She was a substitute teacher in the Fort Bragg Schools when the opportunity to work at North Coast Brewing came along. Sheila’s innate intelligence and her interest in the business led to more and more responsibilities. She began handling state and federal registrations, compliance issues and label approval, taking orders, arranging freight and managing inventory. As her competence and expertise grew, she became an integral part of the business.

Commenting on her promotion, Sheila said “I think I have the best job at the brewery!” Working with NCBC President Mark Ruedrich and Vice President Doug Moody, Sheila is the bridge between production and sales. She manages supply and demand. She knows when, where and how much beer is produced, the timeline of the brewing, bottling and shipping, the orders that need to be filled and how to keep the process moving along in as seamless a way as possible.

She always has a cheerful smile and a friendly greeting even in the midst of dealing with the unexpected. “I put out fires,” she says in her understated way, although she does not hesitate to say what’s on her mind, and when she does, those around her listen. After all, she is deservedly at the center of the action.

Sheila and her husband, NCBC Head Brewer and Plant Engineer Chuck Martins, have a home in Fort Bragg and are the proud parents of two children, 12 year old Joey and 11 year old Maddy. Sheila’s family life is of the utmost importance to her, as is her work life. “Not only do I feel lucky to be where I am with the business today, I feel fortunate to work with the people I do and to work for a business with such great products and high standards. It’s wonderful to feel proud of what we make and what we stand for and to contribute to the quality of life of our community.”

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North Coast Brewing Names Sam Kraynek Controller

Sam-Kraynek(w)Sam Kraynek brings over 40 years of managerial experience to North Coast Brewing Company’s new position of Controller. Sam will be responsible for the financial reporting of the company and establishing policies and internal controls that protect the organization’s assets. NCBC’s President Mark Ruedrich said he is pleased to bring Sam into the business because “We’ve been looking for the right person to be our company controller for some time now. Sam’s leadership skills and his history of innovative management, strategic planning, marketing, sales, manufacturing and finance will strengthen and benefit North Coast Brewing Company.”

Sam’s easy-going, friendly personality belies his hard-driving work ethic. Born, raised and educated in Pennsylvania, his first professional position was an In-Charge Auditor with Ernst & Ernst in Cleveland Ohio. He moved on to work as an Auditor Supervisor for Beatrice Companies and within a decade became President and General Manager of Rosarita Mexican Foods where he developed the idea of manufacturing vegetarian refried beans, now the best-selling refried beans on the market.

After his tenure at Rosarita, Sam held various management positions with a number of companies including Vice President and General Manager of the $70 million Bakery Distribution Division of International Multifoods and Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Bay State Milling, a $200 million flour milling operation. In 1997 Sam answered an ad that led him to the Mendocino Coast. He became CEO of Thanksgiving Coffee Company where he worked for the last 15 years.

Sam began working at North Coast Brewing on April 1, 2013 and he says he’s delighted to be a part of a business that makes quality products, encourages clear communication and ongoing collaboration among its staff and employees and values and respects its workers. In addition, Sam said, “It’s not just about dollars and cents. North Coast Brewing is about community and people and making our coast (and our world) a better place to live, and I like that!”

Sam is an active participate and volunteer in the community. He is past chair and director of the Executive Committee of the Mendocino Coast Chamber of Commerce and currently serves as a director of the Mendocino City Community Services District. He also serves on the Wine and Mushroom and Finance committees of Saint Anthony’s. When he’s not working or volunteering, Sam likes to garden, enjoy the ocean, and travel with his wife, Ginger to visit their children and four grandchildren. In addition, and of course, Sam likes to relax after work with one of North Coast Brewing’s fine craft beers.

Photo by Deborah Moody

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How Beer Gave Us Civilization (or at Least Helped)

 

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Published March 17, 2013 in the New York Times
By Jeffrey P. Kahn

Human beings are social animals. But just as important, we are socially constrained as well.

We can probably thank the latter trait for keeping our fledgling species alive at the dawn of man. Five core social instincts, I have argued, gave structure and strength to our primeval herds. They kept us safely codependent with our fellow clan members, assigned us a rank in the pecking order, made sure we all did our chores, discouraged us from offending others, and removed us from this social coil when we became a drag on shared resources.

Thus could our ancient forebears cooperate, prosper, multiply — and pass along their DNA to later generations.

But then, these same lifesaving social instincts didn’t readily lend themselves to exploration, artistic expression, romance, inventiveness and experimentation — the other human drives that make for a vibrant civilization.

To free up those, we needed something that would suppress the rigid social codes that kept our clans safe and alive. We needed something that, on occasion, would let us break free from our biological herd imperative — or at least let us suppress our angst when we did.

We needed beer.

Luckily, from time to time, our ancestors, like other animals, would run across fermented fruit or grain and sample it. How this accidental discovery evolved into the first keg party, of course, is still unknown. But evolve it did, perhaps as early as 10,000 years ago.

Current theory has it that grain was first domesticated for food. But since the 1950s, many scholars have found circumstantial evidence that supports the idea that some early humans grew and stored grain for beer, even before they cultivated it for bread.

Brian Hayden and colleagues at Simon Fraser University in Canada provide new support for this theory in an article published this month (and online last year) in the Journal of Archeological Method and Theory. Examining potential beer-brewing tools in archaeological remains from the Natufian culture in the Eastern Mediterranean, the team concludes that “brewing of beer was an important aspect of feasting and society in the Late Epipaleolithic” era.

Anthropological studies in Mexico suggest a similar conclusion: there, the ancestral grass of modern maize, teosinte, was well suited for making beer — but was much less so for making corn flour for bread or tortillas. It took generations for Mexican farmers to domesticate this grass into maize, which then became a staple of the local diet.

Once the effects of these early brews were discovered, the value of beer (as well as wine and other fermented potions) must have become immediately apparent. With the help of the new psychopharmacological brew, humans could quell the angst of defying those herd instincts. Conversations around the campfire, no doubt, took on a new dimension: the painfully shy, their angst suddenly quelled, could now speak their minds.

But the alcohol would have had more far-ranging effects, too, reducing the strong herd instincts to maintain a rigid social structure. In time, humans became more expansive in their thinking, as well as more collaborative and creative. A night of modest tippling may have ushered in these feelings of freedom — though, the morning after, instincts to conform and submit would have kicked back in to restore the social order.

Some evidence suggests that these early brews (or wines) were also considered aids in deliberation. In long ago Germany and Persia, collective decisions of state were made after a few warm ones, then double-checked when sober. Elsewhere, they did it the other way around.

Beer was thought to be so important in many bygone civilizations that the Code of Urukagina, often cited as the first legal code, even prescribed it as a central unit of payment and penance.

Part of beer’s virtue in ancient times was that its alcohol content would have been sharply limited. As far as the research has shown, distillation of alcohol to higher concentrations began only about 2,000 years ago.

Today, many people drink too much because they have more than average social anxiety or panic anxiety to quell — disorders that may result, in fact, from those primeval herd instincts kicking into overdrive. But getting drunk, unfortunately, only compounds the problem: it can lead to decivilizing behaviors and encounters, and harm the body over time. For those with anxiety and depressive disorders, indeed, there are much safer and more effective drugs than alcohol — and together with psychotherapy, these newfangled improvements on beer can ease the angst.

But beer’s place in the development of civilization deserves at least a raising of the glass. As the ever rational Ben Franklin supposedly said, “Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”

Several thousand years before Franklin, I’m guessing, some Neolithic fellow probably made the same toast.

Jeffrey P. Kahn, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, is the author of Angst: Origins of Anxiety and Depression.

 

 

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Noyo Food Forest’s Earth Day Festival Supports Farm to School Food Program

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Farm Manager Gowan Lester, unloading a truck full of spent grain and hops donated by North Coast Brewing, is teaching a workshop at the festival about using this valuable resource in the home garden.

Saturday, April 27 is Mother’s Day – Mother Earth That Is!

Noyo Food Forest is a non-profit with a mission to enrich and nurture community by teaching the value and satisfaction of growing and eating one’s own food. North Coast Brewing Company is the Primary Business Sponsor of this worthy organization because we share a common vision of enhancing and encouraging the health and well-being of members of our community.

The Earth Day Festival supports the Farm to School Program that teaches children in the Fort Bragg Schools to grow their own vegetables and supplies the school cafeterias with fresh, organic produce. Children love to eat what they grow!

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The highlight of the 2013 Earth Day Festival is the noon time dedication and launch of Garden Within Reach, a raised-bed, wheelchair accessible garden that makes it possible for elders and mobility challenged people to grow their own food. Noyo Food Forest is using Kickstarter, an online project driven platform, to gather pledges and raise $6,000 for this special garden. Learn more about Kickstarter and pledge to support this project.

If you live on the Mendocino Coast, come on out and celebrate Earth Day with your family and friends! It’s free. It’s healthy. It’s fun!!

Noyo Food Forest’s 7th Annual Earth Day Festival
North Coast Brewing Company – Presenting Sponsor of the Event
Saturday, April 27th from noon to 5 pm
Fort Bragg High School Learning Garden
300 Dana St w Fort Bragg CA 95437
Food - Music - Community Art - Workshops - Plant Sale
Kids’ Activities

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A Look at What an Awesome Beer Drinker Looks Like

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Team North Coast Brewing Company at the 2013 Craft Brewers Conference in Washington D. C.

By Carl Pierre as reported in The Daily Brew
March 27, 2013

The 2013 Craft Beer Conference is in full swing here at the Washington Convention Center, and with the country’s greatest brewers congregating under one roof, you better believe that some pretty interesting insider knowledge is getting passed around. One of the more interesting lectures I had the privilege of attending during today’s conference sessions was “The Who, What, Where, When and How of the Craft Beer Consumer,” a discussion led by Danny Brager from the Nielsen Company on the relevant statistics and trends of the craft beer drinker.

Equipped with extensive Nielsen data on consumer and retail trends over the past few years, Danny provided some pretty compelling statistics and numbers that quickly painted the picture of who drinks craft beer in this country. Here are some of the more interesting figures from Danny’s lecture that caught my eye:

Upscale Beer: It’s What’s For Dinner – Upscale beer (i.e. craft beers) have experienced an overall surge in demand and consumption, and despite the higher pricing of the beer (like a bottle of Dogfish Head over a bottle of Bud), the craft beer segment has seen a massive growth in sales in the past four years that other segments of beer have not been experiencing
Young Folks Be Drinkin’ – Almost 1/3 of beer buyers have purchased a craft beer over the past 12 months, with Millennials representing 47% of the craft beer market (according to market research)
Check Out My Awesome Beer Collection Dude – Household penetration of craft beers has seen growth of 27% over the past four years, from 2008 to 2012
Why Do Craft Beer Drinkers Buy…Well, Craft Beers? – 50% of people polled in a study said they buy craft beers to experiment with flavors, 46% said they bought craft beers because they taste better (duh), and 40% said they enjoy the seasonal offerings that craft beers provide, while 36% of people polled said they buy craft beers as a treat for either a friend or themselves
Millennials make up 32.9% of the volume of craft beer consumers, and this demographic makes up 26.1% of the total adult population
Gen X’ers make up 23.9% of the volume of craft beer consumers, and this demographic makes up 18.7% of the total adult population
Boomers make up 34.6% of the volume of craft beer consumers, and this demographic makes up 37.0% of the total adult population
Men compose 71.9% of the volume of craft beer consumers, and compose 48.3% of the total adult population
Women compose 28.1% of the volume of craft beer consumers, and compose 51.7% of the total adult population
Ethnically, the ‘white’ demographic of drinkers make up 85.6% of total craft beer consumers, and compose 68.0% of the total adult population

 

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Craft Breweries are Chipping Away at Big Beer Dominance.

Small craft breweries, such as North Coast Brewing Company and approximately 2,000 other small breweries, are starting to change the face of beer drinking in the U.S., accounting for about 6% of domestic beer sales. On Sunday, March 17, NPR’s All Things Considered ran a radio article about this growing trend. Click here to listen to the article.

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North Coast Brewing Announces the Release of Class of ’88 Barleywine Style Ale

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1988 was a pivotal year for the emerging craft brewing industry on the west coast, marking the founding of some of America’s most influential breweries, North Coast Brewing Co. among them. It was also the year Fred Eckhardt published The Essentials of Beer Style—a book that quickly became an indispensable reference for aspiring brewers and critics.

In recognition of the 25th anniversary of this milestone year, North Coast Brewing and two other west coast members of the pioneering “Class of ’88,”—Rogue Ales and Deschutes Brewery—have collaborated on a trio of commemorative beers evolving from Fred’s style guidelines.

Each of the breweries has created its own distinctive interpretation of a barleywine. Brewers traveled to each other’s locations and teamed up to brew all three ales. Their common heritage, joint efforts and inherent camaraderie resulted in a cohesive set that allows beer aficionados to enjoy three examples of the style.

These exceptional barleywines are being released in late March of 2013 and are available around the country for a limited time, distinctively packaged in either 22 oz. or 750 ml bottles, or on draft. The breweries are planning Class of ’88 celebrations in Bend and Portland, Oregon and San Francisco and Fort Bragg, California. Read more to find out about these events.

 

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Celebrate the Class of ’88 and the Brewers of the Barleywine

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Photo (left to right) of Ken Kelley, Assistant Head Brewer at NCBC, Pat Broderick, Head Brewer at NCBC, John C. Maier, Brewmaster at Rogue Ales and Cam O’Connor, Brewmaster at Deschutes Brewery

The Class of ’88 breweries have planned four celebratory events around the release of their barleywine ales. All of these celebrations offer horizontal tastings of the three variations. The entire collaboration is a rare event, and the opportunity to taste the three versions will be for a very limited time. So if you’re in the vicinity of Bend or Portland Oregon or San Francisco or Fort Bragg California, join the party, sip some ale and have a good time.

Class of ’88 Celebration Events:
Monday April 8
– Collaboration Dinner at Deschutes Tap Room
Upstairs at the Bend Public House, 1044 NW Bond St., Bend OR
541 382-9242 – Tickets are $38 per person –
All three beers paired with rustic, old-world fare:
Terrine & Charcuterie
Local & Imported Artisan Cheeses
Roasted Leg of Lamb
Braised Rabbit
http://www.deschutesbrewery.com/event/class-88-barley-wine-beer-event

Tuesday April 9 – Collaboration Celebration at Rogue Distillery & Public House
1339 NW Flanders St., Portland OR  (Historic Pearl District)
503 222-5910
All three beers available and Fred Eckhart will join the party

Thursday April 11 – Collaboration Celebration at North Coast’s Brewery Taproom
444 N Main St., Fort Bragg CA – 707 964-3600
All three beers available  4 – 7 pm

Tuesday April 16 – Collaboration Celebration at Eugene City Brewery
844 Olive St, Eugene
541 345-4155
All three beers available

 

 

 

 

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Baritone Monk CD Number 9 on Jazz Week Charts

Baritone Monk CDBaritone Monk by The Claire Daly Quartet, the album that we produced last autumn, is now number nine on the Jazz Week charts!

Click here to read about the album and listen to sample tracks.

Click here to purchase the album and support Jazz education.

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The U.S. brewery count keeps on climbing. Raise your glass!

From an article in The Weekly Pint:

The American craft beer revolution marches on. From an all-time low of 44 in the late 1970s, the nation is now dotted with some 2,130 breweries changing the way we drink beer every day. Portland, Oregon, with its abundant real estate, lowish brewers’ taxes, and access to pristine raw materials from hardy hops to high mountain water leads the way with over fifty breweries in the Rose City (the state has 153 operated by 120 companies overall). Vermont leads the way per capita, with a busy brewery for every 26,073 people. According to figures recently released by the Brewers Association, over 1,300 breweries are in-planning across the U.S., which will send our total well north of 3,000, most in the world. Thirsty yet?

Almost no matter how you look at it, this craft beer revolution is a good thing: according to the Brewers Association, it helps generate jobs (over 100,000 so far) and economic activity (an estimated $3 billion annually in California alone, according to a recent study by the California Craft Brewers Association), and most importantly, the beautiful experience of better beer made by humans, not robots. We’ve heard a few curmudgeons mutter aloud about whether or not there are “too many breweries.” To those killjoys we pose a simple question: has anyone ever complained about “too many wineries”? There are over 7,000 in the U.S. by the way. We’ll reserve the innovative, locally made – and most of all, delicious – creations of craft beer America for cheerier company.

Read the whole article here.

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