Category Archives: Beer

Daryl Makk’s Laughter is the Best Medicine, a Fundraiser for Gloriana Musical Theatre on Saturday, July 13, is sponsored by North Coast Brewing Company

Daryl Makk Tours From Alberta, Canada, accompanied by comedian James Uloth, and guitarist Michael Parlengas

Daryl-Makk-Gloriana-Fundraiser(w)

“I thought I was going to stop breathing several times from laughing so hard.” Nikki Schoeny, Freeport Resident  If laughter is the best medicine then take your medicine at Daryl Makk’s comedy show, Saturday, July 13, Eagles Hall Theatre, 210 N. Corry at Alder, Fort Bragg, 7:30 pm. Adult subject matter, over 18 is advised.

Daryl brings his unique brand of stand-up comedy to the Mendocino coast while on his “The Planet Tour.” A professional comedian and touring motorcyclist Daryl is a two-time survivor of accidents caused by drivers who “did not see the motorcycle.” So now he’s out to solve the invisibility of motorcycles – one joke at a time. Using a combination of story telling and set-up punch lines, James Uloth makes observations on everyday situations we can all relate to.  According to the Humboldt Journal, “James Uloth had the crowd laughing from the get go, with quick-witted punch lines and topical humor.” Guitarist Michael Parlengas opens and closes the comedy show.

$35 ticket includes appetizers and a one drink ticket with Bistro café seating and a silent auction. Advance tickets: Tangents, Harvest Market in Fort Bragg, Out of This World in Mendocino, Gloriana.org, 964-7469, and at the door

Presented by Gloriana Musical Theatre and RevUp Creative Media
Sponsored by North Coast Brewing Company
All beer at the performance donated by NCBC

Posted in California, Events, News, Press Release, Red Seal Ale, Scrimshaw, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

Beer Dinners in Massachusetts & Vermont are part of North Coast Brewing’s 25th Anniversary Year Celebration

North Coast Brewing’s New England Sales Manager, Matthew Webster is one busy man. He is working with four chefs in four restaurants to create menus featuring delectable pairings of food and NCBC beer. These beer dinners will take place between June 18th and June 27th, just as summer begins, celebrating NCBC’s 25th anniversary year as a leader in the craft beer movement.

Brother-Thelonious(w)-Brand-ImageTuesday, June 18: Slate Bar & Grill at 6:30 pm
109 High St, Boston MA
857 269-7372
Course 1
Spring Pea Soup with Spicy Pork Rillete paired with Scrimshaw Pilsner
Course 2
Seared Scallops Habanero Mostarda & Tropical Salsa paired with Brother Thelonious
Course 3
Coarse Coffee-Rubbed Skirt Steak with Sweet Potato Hash paired with Old Rasputin
Course 4
Artisan Cheese Plate paired with Old Stock Ale

Old-Rasputin-Brand-Image-(w)2012Monday, June 24: Stone Hearth Inn & Tavern in collaboration with Meditrina Beer, Wine & Cheese
698 Route 11 West, Chester VT
802 875-9463
Beginnings
Crispy Lollipop Wings with Apricot Glaze and Steamed Mussels with Marinara Sauce paired with Scrimshaw Pilsner & Red Seal Ale
Salad
Grilled Watermelon topped with Arugula with Homemade Ginger Dressing paired with
Le Merle Saison
Entrée
Black Watch Farms Grilled Steak Tips served over Chipotle Polenta paired with Old Rasputin
Cheese
Beer Fondue with Red Hen Bakery Baguette paired with
Old Stock Ale
Dessert
Rhubarb Raspberry Tart topped with Lemon Crème Fraiche paired with Old Stock Ale

Le-Merle-Brand-Image(w)-2012Tuesday, June 25: Tres Gatos Beer Pairing Dinner
470 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain MA
Chef Marcos Sanchez and the entire Tres Gatos team are offering a special tasting menu to complement NCBC beers. Tres Gatos is a “scratch kitchen.” It uses only the freshest ingredients available. Old Rasputin, Le Merle, PranQster and Scrimshaw are available on draft. 2013 Old Stock Ale and Brother Thelonious are available in the bottle.

Old-Stock-2013(w)-Brand-ImageThursday, June 27: Park Restaurant & Bar at 7:00 pm
Four Course Menu by Chef Jesse Perrin – $40.00 per person
59 JFK St, Cambridge MA
617 491-9855
Course 1
Cool Mussel Salad with Fennel & Nasturtium Greens paired with Scrimshaw Pilsner
Course 2
“Welsh Rabbit” with Truffled Mixed Mushrooms & Vermont Shepard Cheese Sauce paired with PranQster
Course 3
Peppered Rib Eye with Creamy Farrotto & Slow Roasted Sweet Onions paired with Brother Thelonious
Course 4
House-made Stout Cheddar Beer Crisps & Pickle Slaw paired with Old Stock Ale

Posted in Beer, Brother Thelonious, Events, Food Pairing, Le Merle, Old Rasputin, Old Stock Ale, PranQster, Press Release, Red Seal Ale, Scrimshaw, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Three New Fermentation Tanks Expand Brewing Capacity

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On the evening of May 13, excited spectators watched a calm and competent crew from North Coast Brewing Company direct the placement of three brand new stainless steel fermenting tanks into the southwest side of the Brewery. Two heavy-duty cranes lifted the 22,000 pound tanks above the roof and lowered them onto the floor. This event was the culmination of over two years of planning, permitting, designing, engineering and construction. Under the direction of NCBC President and Brewmaster Mark Ruedrich, team leaders Chuck Martins, Head Brewer and Plant Engineer, and Mike Wineland, Project Manager, masterminded and implemented this expansion.

JR-1-On-the-Roof-(w)

In preparation for the installation, three twelve foot diameter holes were cut into the Brewery roof and the existing eight inch concrete floor was excavated and replaced by a four foot thick concrete base laced with rebar and topped with steel anchor bolts to hold the fermenters in place. Each tank holds 16,275 gallons, roughly enough to fill 171,500 twelve ounce bottles. When full, each tank will weigh 152,000 pounds. Once the tanks are plumbed and the electrical work is completed, the fermenters will be fully operational. NCBC projects the addition of the tanks will boost production 40% over last year and add about a dozen additional people to the workforce.

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The tanks were manufactured by the Paul Mueller Company in Springfield, MO., and transported 2100 miles to Fort Bragg, CA in three Mueller flatbed trucks. According to one of the drivers, the toughest part of the route was the last 30 miles between Willits and Fort Bragg. If you live on the Mendocino Coast, you can easily see the three new fermenters from the Brewery Taproom across the street from the Brewery on Main Street in downtown Fort Bragg. Check out the NCBC blog to see more photos of the three new tanks.

Truck photo: Bob Swatzell
Roof top photos: Jason Ross

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Join North Coast Brewing June 6 through 8 at Houston’s Big Beer Week

NCBC-Le-Merle-375ml(w)North Coast Brewing’s Texas Sales Manager, Audrey Kiefer, has a busy week coming up in Houston! She’ll be representing NCBC at Wine & Food Week, pouring beer at the Wine Walk on Thursday, June 6 from 5 to 8:30 pm on Market Street and at Sips, Suds & Siders on Friday, June 7 from 5:30 to 9:30 pm at the Woodlands Waterway Marriot.

On Saturday, June 8 she’ll head out to the Houston Beer Festival at Hermann Square Park from 1:00 to 10:00 pm to pour Brother Thelonious, Old Rasputin and Le Merle. This is a major beer event in the Lone Star State and all these events add up to a big BIG beer week in Houston!

Audrey-Keifer(w)

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Craft Beer Replaces Wine as Young Women’s Drink of Choice

 

Detroit Free Press
By Kathy Flanigan
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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Photo of Melissa Modlinski of Paramount Merchants and a Rep for North Coast Brewing in Chicago.

Meagan O’Brien sipped her beer and bit her tongue as the man next to her tried to describe to his date some of the 60 craft beers at a Milwaukee bar. Turns out, he didn’t know his ales from his hefeweizens. “She kept asking questions, and this guy just kept making up stuff,” O’Brien said.

O’Brien, 31, could have set him straight easily. A sales representative for Tallgrass, a craft beer brewed in Kansas, she’s also a certified cicerone – kind of a sudsy version of a sommelier.

Although O’Brien didn’t correct the man at the bar, she had the satisfaction of knowing that the men-know-beer/women-prefer-wine cliche could be on its way out, thanks to a growing wave of interest in craft beer among women.

Groups for beer-drinking women are springing up nationwide, including an international club called Barley’s Angels. Craft beer sales in general have doubled in the past six years and are set to triple by 2017, according to BeerPulse.com. Many of those customers are women between 25 and 34 who appreciate the nuanced flavors of small-batch beers. According to a 2012 Gallup poll, beer has been the favorite beverage among drinkers since 1985. It typically held second place as the adult beverage of choice for females, but recently, beer has edged out wine among women ages 18 to 34. “I like craft beer a lot, and this seemed like a good opportunity to meet with other people who like beer,” said Sarah Booth, 29, during a Barley’s Angels class about pairing beers with food. “It’s just what I like to drink. It feels more personal drinking something that’s brewed in a small batch.”

Julia Herz, the craft beer program director for the Craft Brewers Association in Colorado, has her own theories about why women are moving toward craft beer, defined as the product of a brewery with annual output of 6 million barrels of beer or fewer. Women in their 20s and 30s are in “the sweet spot” for craft beer consumption, Herz said. “They’re the same quality-minded people who are buying artisanal cheeses and fair trade coffees and who don’t mind waiting for a bartender to shake a craft cocktail. Craft beer is an affordable way to buy artisanal. The cost of a bottle of beer, usually less than a bottle wine, affords aficionados a chance to sample several craft beer flavors for a simple trade up in price compared to wine,” Herz said.

Image also factors into the reason that woman are gravitating to beer. “This is bold for me to say, but beer in the past has been marketed as a gender-specific beverage to men,” Herz said. While some macro beer producers use women in tank tops to sell beer, the 2,300 craft brewers in the U.S. generally market in a way that’s not gender specific.

If craft beer producers have learned to make beer a genderless beverage, bartenders are still on a learning curve. Beer expert O’Brien recalls the time she ordered a $12 glass of Angry Monk. The bartender asked what she thought of it, and she mentioned that it seemed a little sour – a term meaning that the beer would benefit from more time in the bottle to mature the taste. He offered to add soda water.

Lucy Saunders, author of The Best of American Beer and Food: Pairing & Cooking with Craft Beer and beercook.com says those bartenders are missing the boat by underestimating a woman’s palate and knowledge of beer.

Still, beer “is a little bit of a boys’ club” Rachel Reiman said during a Barley’s Angels home brewing session in Milwaukee. She notices that whenever she and her husband tour a brewery and mention that they’re home brewers, “they immediately start talking to my husband.”

 

 

 

Posted in Barrel-Aged Old Rasputin, Beer, Blue Star, Brother Thelonious, Grand Cru, Le Merle, News, Old No. 38 Stout, Old Rasputin, Old Stock Ale, Old Stock Ale Cellar Reserve, PranQster, Red Seal Ale, Scrimshaw | Tagged , , | Comments Off

North Coast Brewing Events From May 13 Through May 16 During Seattle Beer Week 2013

If you live in Seattle and love craft beer, you are in luck! Seattle Beer Week has four events featuring North Coast Brewing Beers.

Latona[1]Monday May 13th 6:00 – 9:00 pm
The Latona Pub
6423 Latona Ave NE,
Seattle WA 98115 – 206 525-2238
Class of ‘88 Barleywine Celebration
The Class of ‘88 breweries are hosting a final joint anniversary party in Seattle. This is a celebration offering horizontal tastings of the three variations of barleywines brewed by North Coast Brewing, Deschutes Brewery and Rogue Ales. The entire collaboration is a rare event, and this opportunity to taste all three versions will possibly be the last time you can taste all three variations in one place. So if you’re in the vicinity of Seattle Washington, join the party, sip some ale and have a good time.

Tuesday May 14th 6:00 – 8:00 pm T.-S.-McHugh's-Seattle(w)
T. S. McHugh’s Splendid Foods, Lagers & Ales
21 Mercer St
Seattle WA 98109 – 206 282-1910
Swine & Barleywine
North Coast Brewing will feature the awesome and refreshing PranQster Belgian Style Golden Ale, the exquisite Brother Thelonious Belgian Style Abbey Ale, and the Class of ’88 Barleywine. The T. S. McHugh’s chef will be serving Pork Butt Sliders to compliment these wonderful beers.

Red-Door-Seattle(w)Wednesday May 15th 4:00 – 6:00 pm
The Red Door in Fremont
3401 Evanston Ave N
Seattle WA 98103 – 206 547-7521
Beer & Cheese Pairing Party
Join us at the Red Door in Fremont as we celebrate 25 years of success. To commemorate this special event we have invited Dennis and Theresa from the Cheese Cellar in Seattle to prepare a flight of eight cheeses paired with eight selected beers from North Coast Brewing. This is a rare event and a great way to begin the evening. Each participant who purchases a flight will receive a commemorative goblet to take home.

Thursday May 16th 6:00 – 10:00 pm The-Back-Door-Seattle(w)
The Back Door
462 N 36th St – Fremont
Seattle WA 98103 – 206 632-7322
Brewers Dinner
Menu for the Evening
First Course
Le Merle Saison, Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale paired with
Artichoke-Basil Soup with Goat Cheese and Wild Mushrooms
Second Course
Ruedrich’s Red Seal Ale paired with
Salt Cod Fritters with Lemon Remoulade
Third Course
Brother Thelonious Belgian Style Abbey Ale paired with
Beef Short Rib Braised in Brother Thelonious with Potato Gratin & Mustard Greens
Fourth Course
Old Stock Ale paired with
Banana Bread Pudding in Crème Anglaise

At 10 pm the jazz trio Gravity will perform in a tribute to Thelonious Monk. You can find out more about Gravity at the group’s website.

 

Posted in Beer, Brother Thelonious, Class of '88 Barleywine, Events, Food Pairing, Jazz, Le Merle, Old Stock Ale, PranQster, Red Seal Ale, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

North Coast Brewing Beers Featured at The Backdoor During Seattle’s Beer Week

Seattle might be a city known for brewing up a lot of coffee, but May 9th through 19th is “Seattle Beer Week” spotlighting another kind of brewing and beverage. North Coast Brewing beers will be a major highlight of the week at The Back Door Brewers Dinner on Thursday, May 16 from 6 to 10 pm. Tickets are $50 per person and available online at Brown Paper Tickets.

The Back Door restaurant is entered (you guessed it) through the back door at
462 N 36th St – at Fremont  NCBC-Le-Merle-375ml(w)
Seattle WA 98103
206 632-7322

Menu for the Evening

First Course
Le Merle Saison, Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale paired with
Artichoke-Basil Soup with Goat Cheese and Wild Mushrooms
Second Course
Ruedrich’s Red Seal Ale paired with
Salt Cod Fritters with Lemon Remoulade
Third Course
Brother Thelonious Belgian Style Abbey Ale paired with
Beef Short Rib Braised in Brother Thelonious with Potato Gratin & Mustard Greens
Fourth Course
Old Stock Ale paired with
Banana Bread Pudding in Crème Anglaise

At 10 pm the jazz trio Gravity will perform in a tribute to Thelonious Monk. You can find out more about Gravity at the group’s website.

Posted in Beer, Brother Thelonious, Events, Food Pairing, Jazz, Le Merle, Old Stock Ale, Press Release, Red Seal Ale | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

How Beer Gave Us Civilization (or at Least Helped)

 

Blues-Alley-Doug-at-the-bar(w)

Published March 17, 2013 in the New York Times
By Jeffrey P. Kahn

Human beings are social animals. But just as important, we are socially constrained as well.

We can probably thank the latter trait for keeping our fledgling species alive at the dawn of man. Five core social instincts, I have argued, gave structure and strength to our primeval herds. They kept us safely codependent with our fellow clan members, assigned us a rank in the pecking order, made sure we all did our chores, discouraged us from offending others, and removed us from this social coil when we became a drag on shared resources.

Thus could our ancient forebears cooperate, prosper, multiply — and pass along their DNA to later generations.

But then, these same lifesaving social instincts didn’t readily lend themselves to exploration, artistic expression, romance, inventiveness and experimentation — the other human drives that make for a vibrant civilization.

To free up those, we needed something that would suppress the rigid social codes that kept our clans safe and alive. We needed something that, on occasion, would let us break free from our biological herd imperative — or at least let us suppress our angst when we did.

We needed beer.

Luckily, from time to time, our ancestors, like other animals, would run across fermented fruit or grain and sample it. How this accidental discovery evolved into the first keg party, of course, is still unknown. But evolve it did, perhaps as early as 10,000 years ago.

Current theory has it that grain was first domesticated for food. But since the 1950s, many scholars have found circumstantial evidence that supports the idea that some early humans grew and stored grain for beer, even before they cultivated it for bread.

Brian Hayden and colleagues at Simon Fraser University in Canada provide new support for this theory in an article published this month (and online last year) in the Journal of Archeological Method and Theory. Examining potential beer-brewing tools in archaeological remains from the Natufian culture in the Eastern Mediterranean, the team concludes that “brewing of beer was an important aspect of feasting and society in the Late Epipaleolithic” era.

Anthropological studies in Mexico suggest a similar conclusion: there, the ancestral grass of modern maize, teosinte, was well suited for making beer — but was much less so for making corn flour for bread or tortillas. It took generations for Mexican farmers to domesticate this grass into maize, which then became a staple of the local diet.

Once the effects of these early brews were discovered, the value of beer (as well as wine and other fermented potions) must have become immediately apparent. With the help of the new psychopharmacological brew, humans could quell the angst of defying those herd instincts. Conversations around the campfire, no doubt, took on a new dimension: the painfully shy, their angst suddenly quelled, could now speak their minds.

But the alcohol would have had more far-ranging effects, too, reducing the strong herd instincts to maintain a rigid social structure. In time, humans became more expansive in their thinking, as well as more collaborative and creative. A night of modest tippling may have ushered in these feelings of freedom — though, the morning after, instincts to conform and submit would have kicked back in to restore the social order.

Some evidence suggests that these early brews (or wines) were also considered aids in deliberation. In long ago Germany and Persia, collective decisions of state were made after a few warm ones, then double-checked when sober. Elsewhere, they did it the other way around.

Beer was thought to be so important in many bygone civilizations that the Code of Urukagina, often cited as the first legal code, even prescribed it as a central unit of payment and penance.

Part of beer’s virtue in ancient times was that its alcohol content would have been sharply limited. As far as the research has shown, distillation of alcohol to higher concentrations began only about 2,000 years ago.

Today, many people drink too much because they have more than average social anxiety or panic anxiety to quell — disorders that may result, in fact, from those primeval herd instincts kicking into overdrive. But getting drunk, unfortunately, only compounds the problem: it can lead to decivilizing behaviors and encounters, and harm the body over time. For those with anxiety and depressive disorders, indeed, there are much safer and more effective drugs than alcohol — and together with psychotherapy, these newfangled improvements on beer can ease the angst.

But beer’s place in the development of civilization deserves at least a raising of the glass. As the ever rational Ben Franklin supposedly said, “Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”

Several thousand years before Franklin, I’m guessing, some Neolithic fellow probably made the same toast.

Jeffrey P. Kahn, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, is the author of Angst: Origins of Anxiety and Depression.

 

 

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Class of '88 Barleywine Hits the Shelves!

Barleywine-Bottle-Shot-4(w)Take a look at our Class of ’88 Barleywine in the 750 ml bottle with a cork and wire cap.
We think it looks quite handsome. The Brewery Taproom will have this barleywine on tap and it’s available in limited distribution for a short time in the 750 ml bottles. On Thursday, April 11, the barleywines from Rogue Ales and Deschutes Brewery, Class of ’88 members hailing from Oregon, will be available for a horizontal or “trifecta” tasting at the pub. These three ales have been developed from the same guidelines, but differences in kinds and amounts of malted barley and hops and differences in water will yield three different brews. Curious? Come on over and try all three.

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Le Merle Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale and Salmon Make a Great Pairing

NCBC Le Merle 375 ml

Adapted from a recipe on CraftBeer.com

The mix of rich Gorgonzola cheese with warm balsamic dressing, the crunch of caramelized onions, a hint of lemon, and the aromas of tropical fruit from  Le Merle Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale make this salad a light, healthy and delicious spring lunch or dinner.

Ingredients
8-12 ounces of fresh salmon
1 sweet onion
1 bunch of asparagus
1 bag/box of spring mix salad greens
1 lemon
Gorgonzola cheese
balsamic vinegar
honey
olive oil
Le Merle Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale

NCBC Le Merle 375 mlPrep
Set oven to broil and the place the rack 6 inches from the heat.
Bring a quart of water to a boil, and place frying pan on the stove at medium-high heat.
Cover a baking sheet with foil, and place salmon skin side down.
Mix equal parts honey and Saison to use as a glaze.

Fish
Fish should take about 15 minutes to cook.
Paint the fish with the honey/Le Merle glaze when it goes into the oven and reapply 2 – 3 times as it cooks.
Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork.
Once done, squeeze fresh lemon juice over fish, cover with foil until ready to add to the salad.

Dressing & Final Preparations
Start slicing your onions. Thicker chunks of onion will caramelize better and retain their flavor in the finished salad.
Caramelize the onions in your frying pan with a very small amount of olive oil. Cook until the onions are tender, stirring only once or twice.
Remove the tough ends from the asparagus. Add the spears to the boiling water for about 2 – 3 minutes. Be sure not to cook them fully, as they will be grilled when you make the dressing—same with the onions. When almost finished, remove the onions and asparagus from the heat and put them aside until the salmon is finished cooking.
Once you’ve deemed the salmon fully cooked, heat up a few ounces of olive oil on medium-high heat. When oil is hot, add the onions and asparagus. Then add a few ounces of balsamic vinegar to the mix. Place the salmon over the greens, add the dressing and veggies, and crumble with Gorgonzola cheese.

 

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